336 Miles at 100%!

tfurbay

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Check it out. I typically charge to 85% per my Profile. I accidentally left Direct Charging on overnight and was surprised to see 336 miles for a 100% charge.

I would estimate that 80% of my driving is on local roads at under 50 MPH with the remaining 20% on highways at +70MPH. So that my explain the significant range.

I can’t say that I’ve actually driven 336 miles on a full charge but this is at least the highest capacity I’ve seen or heard of. Fingers crossed is approximately accurate!

94E6A5E9-DC8B-4226-9FE2-E51E5DA1EEC4.png

 

riburn3

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Not surprising. My 4S typically shows around 290 miles. I commute it on an uninterrupted stretch of interstate with the cruise control set at 78mph in range mode. That's even with summer temps hitting 105 degrees so you know that AC is working. Even when I have road tripped it, it is true to its range. I took a convoy road trip to San Antonio with a friend with a Performance Model 3 back in April, I was in my Taycan, and at just about every charging station I would pull in with a bit more range (and it charged faster too).

For the life of me, I have no clue why Porsche devalues their range. I guess if you drive it heavy all the time, range will suffer, but if it's your daily, which I suspect it is for most people, the range is excellent.
 

whitex

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For the life of me, I have no clue why Porsche devalues their range. I guess if you drive it heavy all the time, range will suffer, but if it's your daily, which I suspect it is for most people, the range is excellent.
Under promise and over-deliver, to set themselves apart and opposite of Tesla marketing perhaps?

PS> Cold weather will likely hit your range a lot more more than heat. Even more so if you have to drive through slush and snow.
 

riburn3

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Under promise and over-deliver, to set themselves apart and opposite of Tesla marketing perhaps?

PS> Cold weather will likely hit your range a lot more more than heat. Even more so if you have to drive through slush and snow.
Thankfully snow is rare in the Southwest.

Porsche is notorious for under promise and over-deliver, but I don't think EV range is an area where they should be doing this. I could see if they're off target by 10%, solid bonus, but beating EPA ranges by 40 or 50% is just nuts. Considering range anxiety is the biggest concern for EV buyers still, it doesn't make much sense to me on the surface.
 


whitex

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Thankfully snow is rare in the Southwest.

Porsche is notorious for under promise and over-deliver, but I don't think EV range is an area where they should be doing this. I could see if they're off target by 10%, solid bonus, but beating EPA ranges by 40 or 50% is just nuts. Considering range anxiety is the biggest concern for EV buyers still, it doesn't make much sense to me on the surface.
I think the problem is they don't want to advertise different ranges for the southwest vs. northeast, summer range vs. winter range, etc. They probably also want to leave room for battery degradation. Do you know what % of original battery capacity is warrantied for Porsche? Tesla's warranty kicks in under 70% for example (so a 405 mile rated which charges to 284 miles after some time is still considered normal and not subject to warranty repair or replacement). Tesla is on the opposite side of this by the way, in 8 years of owning 4 different Model S'es, I've yet to hit the EPA rated range on a charge. I prefer manufacturer who over-delivers, rather than under-delivers. As for range anxiety, doesn't Porsche have a range estimate based on current conditions (including your driving style so far) and perhaps your destination?
 

riburn3

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I think the problem is they don't want to advertise different ranges for the southwest vs. northeast, summer range vs. winter range, etc. They probably also want to leave room for battery degradation. Do you know what % of original battery capacity is warrantied for Porsche? Tesla's warranty kicks in under 70% for example (so a 405 mile rated which charges to 284 miles after some time is still considered normal and not subject to warranty repair or replacement). Tesla is on the opposite side of this by the way, in 8 years of owning 4 different Model S'es, I've yet to hit the EPA rated range on a charge. I prefer manufacturer who over-delivers, rather than under-delivers. As for range anxiety, doesn't Porsche have a range estimate based on current conditions (including your driving style so far) and perhaps your destination?
Porsche range manager is pretty junky. It's gotten better but I still stick with ABRP for longer trips.

I absolutely agree it's better to over-deliver, and having owned a Model S and X myself, I likewise never even knocked close to their rated ranges. In the case of Porsche though, the biggest controversy still surrounding the model is the range. Read any review and it's bullet pointed as one of the main negatives about the ride, when in reality, its range has been tested time and again in various climates, conditions, and tire sizes, consistently beating it. I guess I just don't understand why they are okay with EPA ratings that are worse than EV's that came out a decade ago, when again, it's an EV buyers biggest concern.
 

whitex

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Porsche range manager is pretty junky. It's gotten better but I still stick with ABRP for longer trips.

I absolutely agree it's better to over-deliver, and having owned a Model S and X myself, I likewise never even knocked close to their rated ranges. In the case of Porsche though, the biggest controversy still surrounding the model is the range. Read any review and it's bullet pointed as one of the main negatives about the ride, when in reality, its range has been tested time and again in various climates, conditions, and tire sizes, consistently beating it. I guess I just don't understand why they are okay with EPA ratings that are worse than EV's that came out a decade ago, when again, it's an EV buyers biggest concern.
Perhaps they don't want to play Elon's hype games, you know, like sell a car with promise it will drive your kids to school all by itself (remember, all 2016+ Teslas were fully Level 5 autonomy capable according to Tesla, now ask those people who paid for the Level 5 autonomy in 2016, how did that work out for them - even if they had toddlers in 2016, what are the changes that same car will ever drive their kids to school? I would put money down on "none whatsoever"). If VW, Porsche, Audi sets the standard of conservative ranges, others will follow and people will learn "Tesla spec" means "75% on its best day if the stars align just right" (or worse, like the 691hp Tesla spec for P85D). This by the way is already happening, despite the reviewers who live on hype since their revenue is tied to hype, and you simply cannot beat Elon in that arena - he is the hype master, bar none.
 


riburn3

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Perhaps they don't want to play Elon's hype games, you know, like sell a car with promise it will drive your kids to school all by itself (remember, all 2016+ Teslas were fully Level 5 autonomy capable according to Tesla, now ask those people who paid for the Level 5 autonomy in 2016, how did that work out for them - even if they had toddlers in 2016, what are the changes that same car will ever drive their kids to school? I would put money down on "none whatsoever"). If VW, Porsche, Audi sets the standard of conservative ranges, others will follow and people will learn "Tesla spec" means "75% on its best day if the stars align just right" (or worse, like the 691hp Tesla spec for P85D). This by the way is already happening, despite the reviewers who live on hype since their revenue is tied to hype, and you simply cannot beat Elon in that arena - he is the hype master, bar none.
Good point. I guess publishing worst case scenario ranges is probably a good thing vs being overly optimistic.

Don't get me started on FSD, from the beginning it sounded like BS. When a friend bought his Model 3 in early 2019, the Tesla website said "full autonomy expected in late 2019". It said the same thing in 2017 and 2018 respective to those years. I even warned him there's no way, and you are paying a over 10% of the value of the car on an empty promise. It is straight up Vaporware. All those that bought it will end up having their cars for half a decade without ever getting their promised FSD. I can't believe there's not a full on class action lawsuit regarding this, considering how much they charge for it.
 

feye

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As for range anxiety, doesn't Porsche have a range estimate based on current conditions (including your driving style so far) and perhaps your destination?
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Highest range was 330 miles. Maybe it's possible to analyze this data to see how the prediction works?
 

feye

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I guess I just don't understand why they are okay with EPA ratings that are worse than EV's that came out a decade ago, when again, it's an EV buyers biggest concern.
That was discussed extensively over a year ago. The gist: T just reports whatever they want and EPA publishes it. When Porsche came with the Taycan, EPA insisted to put a heavy optioned, 21 inch, Turbo S on their test stand. Nothing much Porsche could do.
 
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whitex

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That was discussed extensively over a year ago. The gist: T just reports whatever they want and EPA publishes it. When Porsche came with the Taycan, EPA insisted to put a heavy optioned, 21 inch, Turbo S on their test stand. Nothing much Porsche could do.

If you want to compare cars, maybe you should look into the new WLTP standard?
Something doesn't make sense to me. If you were right, all Taycan models would show the same EPA rated miles. Are you suggesting the EPA only tested the fully optioned Turbos S and extrapolated all the other models from that?
 

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JimBob

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I did a couple of measured tests as to how long it takes the car to figure out your driving style and adjust the estimated range. The test involved driving at a constant speed of 115 kph / 71.5 mph for the whole trip and determining when the difference between estimated range and actual range travelled reached zero.

I figure the car uses about the last 15 minutes of your driving history to forecast your range.

But a caveat. The loads on the car have to be constant. Same speed, no elevation changes, constant temperatures and no head or tail winds. If any of those come into play, than the forecasted range will change. Which makes sense.

The range estimate the cars shows when you first turn it on is just a guess and may not reflect actual range.
 

 
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