Model S Fire

atebit

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Put up a battery powered, internet connected Nest unit. Took 10 minutes. Recommended!
My understanding is that standard ionization smoke detectors were not a good choice for garages, and that the typical recommendation is to use a high(er than normal)-threshold heat sensor/detector instead?
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jimithing

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My understanding is that standard ionization smoke detectors were not a good choice for garages, and that the typical recommendation is to use a high(er than normal)-threshold heat sensor/detector instead?
Depends
I feel very sorry for that family. Having lived through a house fire myself 20 years ago, I know how traumatic it can be.

On the other hand, it is important to remember the hard data ... there are millions of of electric cars in N America, and these types of incidents are rare. Editors at news agencies need traction for their stories. Yes, this is a sad story (I'm glad the family is ok) but honestly it is still extremely rare, across almost any make or model of EV.

It is not erroneous to assume that driving or parking an ICE car with 20 gallons+ of liquid hydrocarbons with volatile explosive vapors and a low flashpoint is just as dangerous.
It is erroneous to assume that. There's IIHS data on fires. Teslas burn at much higher rates than other similar-age cars. IIHS keeps data on this in the US. Gas cars primarily catch on fire in wrecks or due to fuel leaks while running (looking at you, Ferrari). They don't just spontaneously combust unattended like can happen with thermal runaway on an EV.

These incidents aren't as isolated as most people think they are - here's another one from today.

 

jvincent

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My understanding is that standard ionization smoke detectors were not a good choice for garages, and that the typical recommendation is to use a high(er than normal)-threshold heat sensor/detector instead?
Here is what Nest recommend as to garage installation:

As they are usually not heated or cooled, the actual temperatures experienced in a garage may go above or below the temperature range that the alarm has been designed for. The smoke from engine exhaust fumes can also cause nuisance alarms and damage the sensors of the smoke alarm.
Neither issue applies in my case, but would be a concern to some. Heat detector would be ideal and I'll probably buy one when Nest makes one (although their present generation units have a "heat sensor"). For now, no nuisance warnings and very reliable. Thanks for bringing this up. City code might be a factor as well.
 
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epirali

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TycanNewHampshire

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Ok I am not discounting anything, but I still think this is a very small issue in the scale of things.

From article below

"Tesla's Vehicle Fire Data provided for the period 2012-2020 reveals that there has been about one vehicle fire for every 205 million miles traveled."

https://insideevs.com/news/501729/number-tesla-vehicle-fires-2020/
Once again, I think Elon is manipulating the data to his benefit. The risk is not while driving, unlike ICE cars that can combust via crash and gas + spark (as someone else mentioned), but the risk is when charging / sitting charged.
I would be much more interested in the number of fires / cars owned.
I think the percentage of fires per cars owned might be much more shocking than fires per miles driven. If anyone knows the actual number of fires that have been recorded amongst all EV's (not really interested in bashing Tesla, but rather interested in the overall EV technology) for a time-window, I am sure we can find the number of EV's owned during that time period. Unfortunately, the release Tesla gave gives specific numbers of the miles driven, but conveniently omits the actual number of fires that have been recorded. So, not only can we not look at the percentage of fires/cars owned, but we can't even verify the data that they published without that in the numerator.
 

epirali

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FrozenRobert

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My understanding is that standard ionization smoke detectors were not a good choice for garages, and that the typical recommendation is to use a high(er than normal)-threshold heat sensor/detector instead?
I looked for one of these on Amazon and Home Depot. Could not find a battery operated one, only found one hard wired one.

Any recommendations on where I could find one?
 

TycanNewHampshire

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I retract what I mentioned earlier. I guess the jury is still out on this issue:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brooke...-tesla-model-s-plaid-did-too/?sh=23e9bfc45af8

(The article is from 07-2021 with more recent data)

My current (but very mild) concern is that the Volt uses LG battery technology. AFAIK the Taycan also uses LG, at least from unconfirmed details I've read online.
again, the actual number of fires is omitted.....it makes it really suspect that they keep releasing number of fires / miles driven and never releasing the actual number of fires. I think as an EV community we deserve a clear answer and to be transparent with the number of fires per cars on the road.
If anyone knows this answer, I would be very interested int the % of EV Fires / Cars Owned and not really interested in the # of fires / miles driven. It makes no sense on why this data is hidden, unless there is something to hide....
 

TycanNewHampshire

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my Amazon account says "free international delivery", It says I can have it to my house by Thursday....if you really want it, I am happy to place an order for two and re-ship the second one to you, but if I can get it, you should be able to as well???
 

fullmetalbaal

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I believe any EV that is pushing over 3.5mi/kWh are more prone to catching on fire. Teslas, Kona and Bolt all get over 4mi/kWh, 2 of these have issued recalls due to fires.

Teslas competitive advantage is their unlimited tolerance for risk. Not IP, battery tech, engineering.

This excerpt is for charging, but it's the same principles for their high efficiency and even the Plaid.

GM issued a recall on the Bolt for a lot less.

From Ryan Miller, manager of electrified powertrain development at the Hyundai
20210802_191052.png

I'm confused. Individual battery cells are not running at 400V or 800V. It's a far smaller voltage dictated by their chemistry and cell design, and they are stacked in series &parallel to add up to 400 or 800V at the pack level, right?

The 400 vs 800 then only affects the inverters, some of the electronics, and the inverter to charger cables.

So then all this above sounds like a lot of FUD.

Did I get this wrong? What am I missing?
 
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Henke

Henke

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my Amazon account says "free international delivery", It says I can have it to my house by Thursday....if you really want it, I am happy to place an order for two and re-ship the second one to you, but if I can get it, you should be able to as well???
That's weird.. It looks like I can send it to family in the Midwest but not to California. Appreciate the offer but I should be able to send this to a family member if I do need it. Thank you!
 
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