OP
OP

riburn3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
342
Reaction score
340
Location
TX
Vehicles
Cayenne E-Hybrid, Taycan CT4
Country flag
I totally get it, and have logged enough miles in a Taycan to understand the disparate range potential you can get from the car. I hope people will not take the 251 range achieved by Kyle as gospel - the car hit that distance for one specifically designed test. I may be different than most, but I prefer to take my Taycan on my road trips, while using my e-Hybrid Cayenne to drive around town. Less chances for some idiot texting hitting me!

And, I agree on the EV that goes 400 miles in fast highway conditions. The less stops at unreliable Electrify America chargers the better.

Absolutely, there's just so much variability. 19" wheels vs. 20" vs. 21". This alone could be a 5 or 10% range difference. Power charge cover might matter. How hard to do you drive it? What driving mode is it in? Are you blasting the AC? Is it 100 degree outside or freezing?

I think Taycan EPA estimates, sort of like their 0-60 times, are worst case scenarios in the shittiest conditions. It basically speaks for itself in other manufacturer range tests that nearly all of them, but especially Tesla typically fall well short of their rated range, and Porsche blows past theirs by 20% or more. I never once hit the rated range in either of my Tesla's. My wifes Model X with the 22" rims rated for 260 miles was lucky to get 200 on the freeway.

What these videos really show me is if you drive it conservatively with the intent to get some range out of it, you will without much effort. Unfortunately, the car is just way too fun to drive, so to hell with conservative driving.
Advertisement

 

Sabreliner

Active Member
First Name
Adam
Joined
Sep 5, 2021
Messages
29
Reaction score
40
Location
Upstate NY
Vehicles
'20 Taycan 4S, '91 911 C4
Country flag
I guess I'm one of the few who keeps insisting on the 75-80 mph range tests. When I'm road-tripping, it's going to be a on the Interstate highways the majority of the time where doing 70 mph is annoying and you'll be getting passed like you're standing still... the videos usually show that.

That 251 range will probably translate to ~220 miles or less at 75-80mph, which means about 180 miles usable range unless you're crazy enough to drive from 100% to 0%.

I was considering trading my SUV and T4S+ for a CT, but that range is a deal killer; especially if you plan on carrying a cargo box on top with 2 bikes in the back rack. Oh well. :(
 
OP
OP

riburn3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
342
Reaction score
340
Location
TX
Vehicles
Cayenne E-Hybrid, Taycan CT4
Country flag
I guess I'm one of the few who keeps insisting on the 75-80 mph range tests. When I'm road-tripping, it's going to be a on the Interstate highways the majority of the time where doing 70 mph is annoying and you'll be getting passed like you're standing still... the videos usually show that.

That 251 range will probably translate to ~220 miles or less at 75-80mph, which means about 180 miles usable range unless you're crazy enough to drive from 100% to 0%.

I was considering trading my SUV and T4S+ for a CT, but that range is a deal killer; especially if you plan on carrying a cargo box on top with 2 bikes in the back rack. Oh well. :(

Just curious though what the difference 251 miles of range vs 220 mile range (or even 180) means for an EV on a road trip. With either range, you're still likely making the same charging stops every 100-150 miles, and the car with the lower battery will charge a bit faster to start. The fastest way to road trip is to get the car to roll in with 10% charge or so, and only charge it to the point where you make it to the next stop with 10% charge left.

My 4S is a much faster road trip car than my Model S ever was despite a much higher EPA range just because it charges so much faster. A trip to visit my sister in San Antonio from El Paso was usually a 9.5 hour trip in my Model S 2019 LR, driving 80ish mph. In my Taycan it's closer to 8.5.

Again, the real road trip timesaver is going to be something like the Lucid, that allows you to skip a few chargers while also charging really fast.
 

Sabreliner

Active Member
First Name
Adam
Joined
Sep 5, 2021
Messages
29
Reaction score
40
Location
Upstate NY
Vehicles
'20 Taycan 4S, '91 911 C4
Country flag
Just curious though what the difference 251 miles of range vs 220 mile range (or even 180) means for an EV on a road trip. With either range, you're still likely making the same charging stops every 100-150 miles, and the car with the lower battery will charge a bit faster to start. The fastest way to road trip is to get the car to roll in with 10% charge or so, and only charge it to the point where you make it to the next stop with 10% charge left.

My 4S is a much faster road trip car than my Model S ever was despite a much higher EPA range just because it charges so much faster. A trip to visit my sister in San Antonio from El Paso was usually a 9.5 hour trip in my Model S 2019 LR, driving 80ish mph. In my Taycan it's closer to 8.5.

Again, the real road trip timesaver is going to be something like the Lucid, that allows you to skip a few chargers while also charging really fast.
A lot of my travels take me to some rural areas where I have to do a 200 mile leg between chargers; or it's a location with no DCFCs and limited L2 charging. If the CT4 is going to replace my SUV, then it needs to be able to make that leg with a cargo box and 2 bikes... which I don't see it doing without a great deal of range anxiety.

Hopefully we'll get access to Tesla Superchargers soon to alleviate the range issues, until then my ICE SUV is still gainfully employed.
 
OP
OP

riburn3

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2020
Messages
342
Reaction score
340
Location
TX
Vehicles
Cayenne E-Hybrid, Taycan CT4
Country flag
A lot of my travels take me to some rural areas where I have to do a 200 mile leg between chargers; or it's a location with no DCFCs and limited L2 charging. If the CT4 is going to replace my SUV, then it needs to be able to make that leg with a cargo box and 2 bikes... which I don't see it doing without a great deal of range anxiety.

Hopefully we'll get access to Tesla Superchargers soon to alleviate the range issues, until then my ICE SUV is still gainfully employed.

That def makes sense. Pretty much the reason we got out of my wife's Model X and now she drives a Cayenne E-Hybrid. Mostly pure EV driving for her day to day but we also have the road trip flexbility if we are travelling somewhere chargers are limited or questionable.

Honestly, not really sure there's an EV out there that meets your needs yet. Maybe the Lucid when that hits the streets, but all the attachments will likely kill its range.
 
Last edited:

Sabreliner

Active Member
First Name
Adam
Joined
Sep 5, 2021
Messages
29
Reaction score
40
Location
Upstate NY
Vehicles
'20 Taycan 4S, '91 911 C4
Country flag
That def makes sense. Honestly the reason we got out of my wife's Model X and now she drives a Cayenne E-Hybrid. Mostly pure EV driving for her day to day but we also have the road trip flexbility if we are travelling somewhere chargers are limited or questionable.

Honestly, not really sure there's an EV out there that meets your needs yet. Maybe the Lucid when that hits the streets, but all the attachments will likely kill its range.
The long range Rivian might, but do not feel the need to jump in that early into their business.
 

JimBob

Well-Known Member
First Name
James
Joined
Jan 26, 2021
Messages
528
Reaction score
592
Location
Toronto Canada
Vehicles
Taycan 4S
Country flag
What does the lack of power charge ports have to do with range?
The car uses an air curtain around the front wheels to reduce turbulence. The purpose of the vents is to vent the high pressure build up in the wheel well so it doesn't disturb the air curtain. Probably a small effect except at very high speeds.
 

jvincent

Well-Known Member
First Name
John
Joined
Mar 29, 2021
Messages
77
Reaction score
63
Location
SF Bay Area, CA USA
Vehicles
Audi e-tron Edition One, CT4 Ice Grey on order
Country flag
It should be more aerodynamic going backwards - shape of a drop of water - when will they start shaping cars like that?
That’s a good point. How fast can the Taycan go backwards? Road trip!! ;)
 

thecoloradokid

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 17, 2020
Messages
236
Reaction score
497
Location
Denver
Vehicles
2021 Taycan 4s, 2019 e-hybrid Cayenne
Country flag
The long range Rivian might, but do not feel the need to jump in that early into their business.

I have a 400 mile range R1T on order. I will be excited if it gets 325 or 350 miles of range with bikes in the back.

I figure if I can survive generation one Model X and generation one Taycan 4s, I can survive another first generation vehicle.
 

mdrobc1213

Well-Known Member
First Name
Rob
Joined
Aug 2, 2021
Messages
52
Reaction score
24
Location
Hawaii
Vehicles
992 Carrera, X3e, M4, Cross Turismo 4 (ordered)
Country flag
EQS, 0.2 Cd, comes close to it! ;)
Yeah I think EQS numbers released recently are quoted to be around 380+ to 420+ for the upgraded EQS580 model. Porsche needs to talk to Audi and Lucid on battery charging and range I think!
 
Advertisement

 
ZYRUS
Advertisement
Top