JimBob

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Depends on the regen setting. On, your car will slow down. Off, you will probably hold speed (force from gravity = force from wind resistance), depending of course on speed.

Depends on the regen setting. On, your car will likely continue accelerating, but slowly. Off, your car will accelerate faster.

I think you are possibly missing the point - that is regardless of speed, regen setting, pressing brake pedal, lifting off the accelerator - with this car if you are slowing down (other than because you are now going UP a grade) then the car is using regen to slow down, capturing kinetic energy and returning it to the battery (with a conversion loss). The regen setting doesn't enable / disable this - it only affects if regen kicks in when you lift off of the accelerator. 265W of regen is significant force - you will be stopping plenty hard before the hydraulic brakes even kick in (until of course your speed gets too low.
The previous poster looks like he got it right. The regen on pedal lift is weak. To maximize it you need to get the brake involved somehow. His comment appears to do that. InnoDrive on the downslope. The 265 is a maximum.

This quote from the Porsche Taycan Press Kit Technology Workshop

In the Taycan, Porsche takes its own approach in a number of ways within these parameters:

• The maximum potential recuperation capacity of up to 265 kW is significantly greater than
that of most competitors, decelerations of up to 3.8 m/s2 are recuperated.

• When the accelerator pedal is released, the Taycan is designed to always roll or coast as far
as possible; the available kinetic energy is reserved for dealing with the driving route.

• Recuperation takes place only when the brake pedal is pressed, but then, as mentioned above, with a very high level of energy recovery.

With the strategy of controlling recuperation mainly via the brake pedal, the customer experiences reproducible and predictable deceleration behaviour which is independent of battery charge and temperature. Testing has shown that, Thanks to the Taycan’s high recuperation output of up to 265 kW, approximately 90 percent of braking operations in everyday use are performed by the electric motors alone, without activating the wheel brakes. For this reason and for the first time ever, Porsche is prescribing a time-dependent replacement interval for the brake pads: they must be replaced every
six years.
 

BayAreaJay

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Turbo with 21" wheels and I did 270 miles last summer on about 90% of the usable battery capacity (started with 100% SOC, finished with 10%). Warm battery, warm air so no heating and limited need for AC, 65 - 75 MPH most of the way, all flat, all highway.

It is more efficient to cruise at a constant speed than to speed up and slow down, however when you slow down, regen will be used (regardless of the setting - the setting only controls whether regen is activated only by the brake pedal or also by lifting off the accelerator).
This is pretty good. My MY21 TTS is fairly new (<400 miles) but it has never shown >210miles range.
Key things to note is that I got all the options that hurt the range (conscious decision as I use ICE for long distance travels) such as Mission E'21 wheels, automatic charge door, and most importantly a lead foot with heart longing for super quick acceleration (including launch controls).
So, give the above, I think I'm happy I see the ~200 range.
 

NC_Taycan

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This is pretty good. My MY21 TTS is fairly new (<400 miles) but it has never shown >210miles range.
Key things to note is that I got all the options that hurt the range (conscious decision as I use ICE for long distance travels) such as Mission E'21 wheels, automatic charge door, and most importantly a lead foot with heart longing for super quick acceleration (including launch controls).
So, give the above, I think I'm happy I see the ~200 range.
I have many of those same options (21", power charge port doors, heavy right foot). I think it's all about battery temperature and driving history. It's in the 40s - 50s now, and I'm mostly making short trips. My range has dropped to 200-210 miles. I just got back from one such short trip with three launch control take-offs, a few aggressive turns with braking that might have exceeded the regen capability, and general driving style that might have gotten me a you're #1 sign from other drivers, had I passed any. 161 kWh/100 miles, and at 45% SOC my predicted remaining range is 103 miles, battery at 75 deg. F (started at 54 deg. F for this trip, Sport Plus the whole time so lots of battery pre-heating).

Your range will probably go up in another 100 miles - your car might still be avoiding regen to bed in the brakes.
 

kort

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This is pretty good. My MY21 TTS is fairly new (<400 miles) but it has never shown >210miles range.
Key things to note is that I got all the options that hurt the range (conscious decision as I use ICE for long distance travels) such as Mission E'21 wheels, automatic charge door, and most importantly a lead foot with heart longing for super quick acceleration (including launch controls).
So, give the above, I think I'm happy I see the ~200 range.
the wheels have a slight impact on range, the automatic door has no impact at all, and your lead foot is the issue.
 

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