Usable portion of the Taycan's 93 kWh battery?

Kingske

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InsideEVs recently published a comment on Bjorn Nyland - who I respect - testing the range of Audi's e-Tron GT:

https://insideevs.com/news/510307/audi-etron-gt-bjorn-range/

Towards the end, the article refers to Nyland's earlier range tests with a Taycan 4S and his observations that the Taycan's 93 kWh battery respectively showed an 86.9 and 86.1 kWh usable capacity in his two runs. Porsche officially states a 83.7 kWh usable portion of the battery but during my own runs I also got the strong impression that this usable capacity was larger, although it is difficult to pinpoint it exactly given charging losses etc. Could this also be a spec where Porsche under-promises and overdelivers? Or is the usable capacity a pretty fixed given? Can a lay person measure it? Has any of the forum members done so?
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benver

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...Can a lay person measure it? Has any of the forum members done so?
Maybe you can yourself by using the following scenario:
Fill your battery to 100%
Drive with your car until you have 10% charge left.
Now check how much kWh has been used for your trip.
Since you have 10% left, you need to multiply this by 10 and divide it by 9.
That's an estimate that is probably close to the actual figure.

Make sure you can reach a fast charger with the 10% left ;)
 

JimBob

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As a first approximation, possibly.

In principle it should be doable and if I was buying a used Taycan, it would be something that I would want to see.

But you aren't going to get an accurate reading this way as you are using the car's metering and all the software manipulations that are going on in between. You need to charge the battery to 100% SOC and then discharge into a load through a meter. Not likely for the layman. There are couple of YouTube videos out there that show how it can be done but probably not advisable.
 
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Kingske

Kingske

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Maybe you can yourself by using the following scenario:
Fill your battery to 100%
Drive with your car until you have 10% charge left.
Now check how much kWh has been used for your trip.
Since you have 10% left, you need to multiply this by 10 and divide it by 9.
That's an estimate that is probably close to the actual figure.

Make sure you can reach a fast charger with the 10% left ;)
Thanks, but that unfortunately doesn't work. I tried it and arrived at a calculated capacity of more than 90 kWh which is unlikely to be the real usable capacity. The problem seems to be in the charging losses between what the charger gives (and counts) and what the battery takes. Measuring those loses requires specialized equipment, I am afraid.
 

JimBob

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Thanks, but that unfortunately doesn't work. I tried it and arrived at a calculated capacity of more than 90 kWh which is unlikely to be the real usable capacity. The problem seems to be in the charging losses between what the charger gives (and counts) and what the battery takes. Measuring those loses requires specialized equipment, I am afraid.
Here is a recent article on battery capacity in used EV's and just how little information is currently available.

https://www.vice.com/en/article/g5gyz3/electric-vehicle-used-car-battery-health-nissan-leaf
 
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