Ideal charging to maximize battery capacity?

Snowbird

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A big misconception is that the car is constantly charging whenever it is plugged in. This is patently false (you can watch the display on your charger). Just because you are "plugged in" doesn't mean the batteries are "charging"!

Power is merely AVAILABLE when the car is plugged in. The car is only actually charging whenever it turns on the onboard charging circuit. Its up to the onboard software (God help us!) to determine if/when the batteries need to be charged or topped up to a specific level (85%).
each time I come back , I put the plug into my car. 85% is research
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Squiden

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Also, I note that it is even better than that, at least based on the study. The benefit low depth of discharge (DoD) cycles is that it allows you to consume more than the amount you would if you do high (DoD). So, in your example, you could do as many as 10,000 mini regens (not precise, just to show as a magnitude).
That was exactly my point - you can do significantly more short charge cycles than large ones (or "mini-cycle"). Most Li-Ion charts I've seen show minimal degradation when the batteries are kept between 50% SOC - 85% SOC over 100,000+ cycles - it's not until you get into deep discharges (<20% SOC) or rapid charging (2 - 3C charge/discharge rates) where you start to have problems, but the battery packs are so big on the Taycan that is not an issue.
 

porsche_coyote

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Not really. A charge cycle is the equivalent of charging once from 0 to 100. So if each regen puts 0.1% (for example) back then it takes 1000 regens to equal on cycle.
No. It's not a linear relationship. Charging a lithium ion battery to 100% is FAR harder on its lifespan than charging it to 85%. That last 10-15% is tough on the battery, particularly if combined with elevated temperatures (more than around 80°F/27°C). And as mentioned elsewhere in this thread, discharging to zero is likely to kill the battery.

As noted above, the smaller charge/discharge cycles you get from partial charging or use of recuperation aren't nearly as hard on the battery as a full charge, particularly if it's a DC Fast charge.

It's fair to say that nobody has a definitive answer yet other than "don't do things that we know for sure can kill batteries."
 

John89

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There are few days that I will be driving my car more than 10-20 miles, many days even less. I've been plugging in the car every night, and charging up to 85%. But I don't really need to do that. Does anyone know, in terms of maintaining the battery capacity, would there be any advantage to charging less frequently? Like only charging when I get down to, say, 20% remaining? Or is it better to keep it topped up to 85%? Or something in between...?
I don't charge every night but I do frequently. 85% is max I charge
 
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