Taycan Interior Dash

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edouard356

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I see the LTE signal. I wonder if that's just the bluetooth cell connectivity or built-in cell for "over the air" updates.
 

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I see the LTE signal. I wonder if that's just the bluetooth cell connectivity or built-in cell for "over the air" updates.
It's the WiFi 4G connection.
It's for remote control, like heating/cooling, charging schedules, open/close doors/windows, flash horn/lights, sending routes to the nav/msg, checking status (battery state, covered distance, driving style etc.
At least, that's what my i3 does.
But yeah, OTA is technically possible.
With my i3 I just download the updates from internet and put the USB in the car, it checks if there's a newer version and starts to install after typing in a unique number based on my account and VIN of the car.
 

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Looking at the photo we can see the current range of the vehicle which is 286km. It looks to have about 75% charge remaining (eyeball estimation). So a full charge range would be 381 km or 236 miles. That’s a bit concerning if the range at full charge is only around 240 miles.

Edit: Changed km from 268 to 286 and updated corresponding KM and Miles
 
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Dee

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Looking at the photo we can see the current range of the vehicle which is 268km. It looks to have about 75% charge remaining (eyeball estimation). So a full charge range would be 357km or 221 miles. That’s a bit concerning if the range at full charge is only around 220 miles.
That doesn't say anything really.
You don't know how the driving style was.
The car calculates an estimate based on previous driving style.
Now, doing pull ups all the time defenately decreases your range and all the journalists or testers want to do one thing: driving hard and pull up as fast as they can.
It'll be ok, trust me.
 

Blackbird76

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That doesn't say anything really.
You don't know how the driving style was.
The car calculates an estimate based on previous driving style.
Now, doing pull ups all the time defenately decreases your range and all the journalists or testers want to do one thing: driving hard and pull up as fast as they can.
It'll be ok, trust me.
Read somewhere (car and driver or motortrend) that the final range will be closer to 200 miles than 300 miles, hopefully this is wrong and i'll be pleasantly surprised come Sep 4th.
 

Dee

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Read somewhere (car and driver or motortrend) that the final range will be closer to 200 miles than 300 miles, hopefully this is wrong and i'll be pleasantly surprised come Sep 4th.
Range is somewhat overrated.
It's a common question asked by people who don't have experience with driving an EV.
Once they have, it becomes clear.
Driving an EV makes me realize a few things:
1. I don't drive that much km per day.
2. My car sits still more than 20 hours a day, loads of opportunities to charge...
3. I don't drive for 4 hours straight.

I can only speak for myself of course but this is what I hear too when talking to other EV owners.

With a petrol car you don't realize how much km you drive per day, only per tank.
When it's empty you fill it up again but you don't realize how much you drive per day and there lies your key.
Charging at home or work gives you the same freedom but you are more aware now.
 

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If the range is 380km it'll be quite sufficient for me. The longest regular route I drive is 280km so I could do that in a pinch without stops, without charging, probably during the winter also, if need be. I'll of course be charging it at home and then on longer trips obviously.

The key for me is to not have to stop for a charge on my regular route if I'm in a hurry. That's all I care about.
 
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felixtb

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Well, it all really depends on how you use your car...... there are a lot of people that drive longer distances per day and then range does become a serious concern. I am an EV driver since spring 2011 and a EV only household since 2015...... so I guess we rely on range quite a lot. And I now only lease EVs since I can then change when I can get a model with better range. However, all EV manufacturers have different range algorithms and what is 240miles in one EV in the real world could be something entirely different for another. Much depending on how the battery is cooled and motor efficiency at different working temperatures and how the car slices through the air at different speeds. Some of these parameters can also be perfected for the different official mileage numbers and do poorly in more REAL world driving. Which sadly I understand is a little bit the case with the e-Tron.......
 

Dee

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Well, it all really depends on how you use your car...... there are a lot of people that drive longer distances per day and then range does become a serious concern. I am an EV driver since spring 2011 and a EV only household since 2015...... so I guess we rely on range quite a lot. And I now only lease EVs since I can then change when I can get a model with better range. However, all EV manufacturers have different range algorithms and what is 240miles in one EV in the real world could be something entirely different for another. Much depending on how the battery is cooled and motor efficiency at different working temperatures and how the car slices through the air at different speeds. Some of these parameters can also be perfected for the different official mileage numbers and do poorly in more REAL world driving. Which sadly I understand is a little bit the case with the e-Tron.......
And the Ipace, even more.
Still, I think the owner is the limitation, not the car.
Most people, who drive long distances, don't like charging.
By making range an issue they make it look like recharging is such a big thing.
It totally depends on you as a person, to be more specific: what's 20 minutes of recharge after 2 or 3 hours of driving?
It's all like such a black/white discussion...
Still, I know what you mean as my i3 only does 90km at highway and 140km regular but it has a range of 9000+km if I want to, I'm the limitation, not the car.
Got my drift?
 

edouard356

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You can see the 2nd screen on the photo. next to the navigation screen where it reads Taycan.
Based on the pic from Jonny's test, it appears it will have the center console screen (see lower right portion of pic) similiar to the concept.

Capture.PNG
 

PP4EH

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Range Will be 515 km wltp
 

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And the Ipace, even more.
Still, I think the owner is the limitation, not the car.
Most people, who drive long distances, don't like charging.
By making range an issue they make it look like recharging is such a big thing.
It totally depends on you as a person, to be more specific: what's 20 minutes of recharge after 2 or 3 hours of driving?
It's all like such a black/white discussion...
Still, I know what you mean as my i3 only does 90km at highway and 140km regular but it has a range of 9000+km if I want to, I'm the limitation, not the car.
Got my drift?
I do not think folks from countries that are physically smaller understand limited mileage in larger areas. It is not only the time having to recharge 2-3 times in one day. It is also the fact that driving in areas that are larger entail that a quick charger is 150-200 miles off one’s route. A vehicle with less than a 300 mile range is laughable and extremely impractical for many.
 

Ron R

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I do not think folks from countries that are physically smaller understand limited mileage in larger areas. It is not only the time having to recharge 2-3 times in one day. It is also the fact that driving in areas that are larger entail that a quick charger is 150-200 miles off one’s route. A vehicle with less than a 300 mile range is laughable and extremely impractical for many.
While I think a 300 mile range might be a problem for some, many of us don't need anywhere near 300 miles per charge. I view a large battery like that as weight that I don't need. My primary commuting car is an EV that does 70 miles per charge on good conditions, which works out fine for me.

Porsche set the range of the Taycan based on a number of factors including time spent charging, weight, battery cost, etc. I'm sure they realize that unfortunately they will not satisfy every perspective owner with the tradeoffs they made. Since weight is such a crucial parameter in the equation, the idea of coming up with a high-speed charging system to minimize the amount of time spent charging is a good one, IMO.
 

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