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400 Mile day trip through the Colorado mountains - power/battery consumption info for Taycan 4S

thecoloradokid

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Was a gorgeous day in Colorado today, so I drove my new 4s on a break-in drive to Aspen from Denver via Leadville and Independence Pass. The drive was 400 miles and over 6 mountain passes, and, except for a challenging charging effort at an Electrify America location, the car handled the drive like a champ. The car was more efficient than anticipated, and the regeneration is impressive when coming down from a 11,000 or 12,000 ft mountain pass. I am by no means a professional driver, but I beyond impressed with the handling and cornering - it made the drive today pretty amazing. Thought I would share a couple pictures from the drive today. And, if you live near mountains, get out and enjoy them in your Taycan.
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JayGT4

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Amazing scenery and thanks for sharing the positive feedback on the driving experience. Frozen Blue under those blue skies is a perfect match :involve:
 

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Thank you for sharing the story and especially the photos @thecoloradokid. The car in that scenery is gorgeous. Would you mind sharing any of your kWh/100mi or such efficiency numbers?
 
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@ron_b : I certainly took pictures of the power usage screen during points of my trip to measure usage. I break down by segments in my road trip yesterday. The first leg yesterday was from my house in central Denver to the Electrify America chargers, in Frisco, CO. It is a straight shot down I-70 that is an up hill drive until you hit Eisenhower Tunnel at 11,000 ft. then you depend into Frisco. Pictures are in chronological order starting from my house to the top of Eisenhower Tunnel then down to the bottom of the pass, and then finally the battery status when I arrived at the EA charger in Frisco, CO.
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thecoloradokid

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@ron_b : here are pictures that show power consumption in my 4s from the EA charger in Frisco to Leadville, via Fremont Pass and then to Aspen via Independence Pass. Fremont Pass is 11,300 ft and Independence Pass, as you can see in the picture of my car, is 12,000 ft. Pictures are in chronological order from my departure from Frisco, CO to the top of Independence Pass to my arrival in Aspen.
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thecoloradokid

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@ron_b : final post is the power consumption from the EA charger in Glenwood Springs, CO back to my house in Denver. While I did not get a picture of the start, I did get a picture of showing the results just as I pulled into my driveway. There are two mountain passes from Glenwood Springs to Denver - Vail Pass at 10,700 ft and Eisenhower Tunnel at 11,000 feet. From there it is downhill all the way to Denver.

I realize there are videos on the web by the guys in Norway and their drive to Spain, or Bjorn and his range tests. But, these don't have any real world impact on me since I live in Colorado, and 99% of my long distance driving will be done heading west through the heart of the Rockies. Yesterday was the "shake down" journey so I could understand the battery use impact of amending large mountain passes, and also the recuperation affect on the battery when descending. Since you are in the Bay Area this will have a similarly affect on you when you drive to Tahoe or Reno since you will have to go up and down the Sierras. I thought the car did great on the drive, and I am looking forward to road tripping to Vegas in the near future.
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Thanks for all the details along the route @thecoloradokid . Certainly great efficiency for such a challenging environment.

I was wondering on the speck of your car oh, did you get features like PTV+ or PDCC when you're doing so much mountain driving and if so can you comment on the endling in tighter corners?
 

PanameraFrank

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WOW! 26.7 kWh/100 miles is INSANE efficiency and that includes a drastic elevation gain?

I mean, WOW. 26.7 is 317 miles of actual range. Crazy, crazy good.
 
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WOW! 26.7 kWh/100 miles is INSANE efficiency and that includes a drastic elevation gain?

I mean, WOW. 26.7 is 317 miles of actual range. Crazy, crazy good.
@PanameraFrank : there is huge elevation loss in those figures from Glenwood Springs, CO to Denver. While you ascend two big mountain passes - Vail Pass and up to Eisenhower Tunnel - it is 60 miles of down hill from the 11,000 ft at Eisenhower Tunnel to my house in Denver at 5,280ft. You have to compare that with the earlier picture of me driving up to Eisenhower Tunnel where I was doing 52kwh per 100 mile. As they say, what goes up, must come down!

P.S. I think I have come close to mastering when to turn on and off the regen/recoup as well. It helps having the button on the steering wheel, so you can turn on and off coming down hills to help with gaining speed via downhill momentum and by slowing down when turning it back on. this plays a big factor in improving efficiency numbers.
 
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thecoloradokid

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@ron_b : I have a very vanilla spec on my 4s. I do not have the chrono package, or any of the suspension upgrades. That being said, the car still handles and corners incredibly well.
 

PanameraFrank

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@PanameraFrank : there is huge elevation loss in those figures from Glenwood Springs, CO to Denver. While you ascend two big mountain passes - Vail Pass and up to Eisenhower Tunnel - it is 60 miles of down hill from the 11,000 ft at Eisenhower Tunnel to my house in Denver at 5,280ft. You have to compare that with the earlier picture of me driving up to Eisenhower Tunnel where I was doing 52kwh per 100 mile. As they say, what goes up, must come down!
True, but generally with EVs the loss of efficiency gaining elevation is greater than the regen coming down. Really incredible how Porsche has made the car's regen so incredibly effective.

My iPace going up and down a similar pass would have efficiency numbers upwards of 40 kWh/100 miles and even in normal, efficiency driving never below 32 kWh/100 miles.
 

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yeah, it’s very impressive. I can’t wait to see what my average is with daily drives to the office & the odd motorway/country road trips.
 
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True, but generally with EVs the loss of efficiency gaining elevation is greater than the regen coming down. Really incredible how Porsche has made the car's regen so incredibly effective.

My iPace going up and down a similar pass would have efficiency numbers upwards of 40 kWh/100 miles and even in normal, efficiency driving never below 32 kWh/100 miles.
True, but generally with EVs the loss of efficiency gaining elevation is greater than the regen coming down. Really incredible how Porsche has made the car's regen so incredibly effective.

My iPace going up and down a similar pass would have efficiency numbers upwards of 40 kWh/100 miles and even in normal, efficiency driving never below 32 kWh/100 miles.

I maybe off base, but I really think the ability to use the regen/recoup button helped immensely. I drove Tesla's for four years - a Model S and a Model X - so, the one foot driving made regenerating energy while going down hill pretty easy. I owned an Audi e-Tron for three months before trading it in on the Taycan, and it has the paddles to engage the regen braking. I really think the three months of playing around with the Audi helped me get in the mind set on how to engage the same process on the Taycan, but via the steering wheel button. Mind you, I have yet to try the "auto recuperation" mode on the Taycan, so I am not sure if it works similarly to me turning it on and off manually via the steering wheel button. I will experiment with that next weekend.
 

PanameraFrank

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I maybe off base, but I really think the ability to use the regen/recoup button helped immensely. I drove Tesla's for four years - a Model S and a Model X - so, the one foot driving made regenerating energy while going down hill pretty easy. I owned an Audi e-Tron for three months before trading it in on the Taycan, and it has the paddles to engage the regen braking. I really think the three months of playing around with the Audi helped me get in the mind set on how to engage the same process on the Taycan, but via the steering wheel button. Mind you, I have yet to try the "auto recuperation" mode on the Taycan, so I am not sure if it works similarly to me turning it on and off manually via the steering wheel button. I will experiment with that next weekend.
Great advice! I do a ton of mountain driving so I will definitely use this technique.
 

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