NC_Taycan

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Lewis
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Well, you might have exactly that if you dial back the PMCC power to 6 kW... That would be a pain though - you'd have to remember to set it back when you actually wanted to charge.
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Scandinavian

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Hi Peter. From the tests one can deduce:
By interpolation it is seen that the battery has reached the temperature 14C after approx. 40 min.
2. Approximately 4 kWt has been used to heat the battery.
It can be deduced from this that approximately 6 kW has been used to heat the battery during start-up.
The battery heater must therefore have a maximum power of at least 6 kW, but it may well be larger.
I will perform a few tests with lower power (about 2.3 kW) later and post the result here.
Yes very interesting.

If the car uses 6 kW or more to heat up the battery in this charging environment, I would believe that the same amount of power, 6 kW is used as well when driving the car in very cold weather. Imagine it would be minus 15 degrees C and trying to heat the mass of that battery. It will take time. That would explain a lot for those who have experienced low range in cold weather.
In your case you consumed 4 kWh which is about 5% of the battery capacity to heat from 1 to 14 C. If you only drove short 30 minutes trips it would be draining the battery quickly.

I envy @feye that seems to have 19 degrees weather still!
 

MadsK

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Yes very interesting.

If the car uses 6 kW or more to heat up the battery in this charging environment, I would believe that the same amount of power, 6 kW is used as well when driving the car in very cold weather. Imagine it would be minus 15 degrees C and trying to heat the mass of that battery. It will take time. That would explain a lot for those who have experienced low range in cold weather.
In your case you consumed 4 kWh which is about 5% of the battery capacity to heat from 1 to 14 C. If you only drove short 30 minutes trips it would be draining the battery quickly.

I envy @feye that seems to have 19 degrees weather still!
Yes, but the car will not heat the battery as much as when charging.
Drove a trip yesterday at 31km / 19.4miles. Consumption was low due to few stops.
Preheated the car for 10-15 min before departure. driving mode "Normal". Battery temp at start was 3C / 37F. By the end, the temperature had only risen to 4C / 39F.
I have not experimented much with how to increase the battery temperature in winter, but have only once seen the temperature rise rapidly in connection with fresh driving on a winding road in "Sport Mode".

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