Reg

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https://www.edmunds.com/car-news/electric-car-range-and-consumption-epa-vs-edmunds.html


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Latest Highlights
  • Porsche Taycan outperforms its EPA range estimate by the widest margin
  • Every Tesla we've tested has failed to hit its EPA range estimate
  • There are four EVs in Edmunds' 300-mile club, including a Ford and a Hyundai
What is this chart showing me?
This chart shows an electric vehicle's official EPA range and energy consumption compared to the range and consumption results from Edmunds' own testing, which is designed to be a real-world complement to the EPA's laboratory-based process. If you see arrows in a column heading, click it to change the sort order.

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What is EPA estimated range?
In short, this is the approximate number of miles that a vehicle can travel in combined city and highway driving (using a mix of 55% highway and 45% city driving) before needing to be recharged, according to the EPA's testing methodology.

But what exactly is that methodology? First, the vehicle is fully charged and parked overnight. The following day, the vehicle is driven on a dynamometer — it's like a treadmill for cars — over successive simulated city and highway routes until the battery is depleted. The total distance traveled is then multiplied by a correction factor that the EPA has determined will more accurately reflect what drivers can expect to achieve in the real world. The value of this correction factor, which is always less than 1 but greater than 0, is determined by the number of drive cycles a vehicle is tested on.

In short, there's certainly a method to the EPA's madness, but the process is laboratory-based, and EV owners don't drive their cars in a lab. So what's the real-world version? That's where Edmunds' EV range testing comes in.

What is EPA estimated consumption?
Akin to miles per gallon (mpg) for fuel-burning vehicles, this metric represents electric vehicles' energy consumption in kilowatt-hours per hundred miles (kWh/100 miles). A battery stores energy in kilowatt-hours much like a gas tank stores fuel in gallons. This value tells you how much energy in kilowatt-hours a vehicle would use to travel 100 miles.

Unlike mpg, however, where a larger number is better (for example, a vehicle that gets 30 mpg is better than one that gets 20 mpg), a smaller number is better in kWh/100 miles because you are using less battery energy per mile. So a vehicle that uses 20 kWh/100 miles is more efficient than one that uses 30 kWh/100 miles.

In EPA testing, once a vehicle battery is depleted, it is recharged using the manufacturer-supplied charger for that vehicle. The energy consumption is then determined mathematically from the recharging energy, the energy-discharge data from the vehicle, and the distance traveled for each cycle. The recharge energy includes any charging losses due to inefficiencies in the manufacturer’s charger.

What is Edmunds tested range?
Edmunds begins with full battery charge and drives an electric vehicle on a mix of city and highway roads (approximately 60% city, 40% highway) until the battery is almost entirely empty. (We target 10 miles of remaining range for safety.) The miles traveled and the indicated remaining range are added together for the Edmunds total tested range figure. We prefer to use a higher percentage of city road driving because we believe it's more representative of typical EV use.

What is Edmunds tested consumption?
After a vehicle completes its road loop and the battery is nearly empty, it's charged back to full capacity. The kilowatt-hours used from plug-in to a full charge are tracked and then we calculate the consumption based on the miles traveled (less the remaining range). This process takes into account charging losses in the Edmunds tested consumption number.

What is Range % difference EPA vs. Edmunds?
This figure is the difference between the EPA's range estimate and the range tested in Edmunds' real-world testing. A positive percentage (in green) means Edmunds exceeded the range estimated by the EPA, while a negative percentage (in red) means a vehicle fell short of its EPA range during our test.

What is Consumption % difference EPA vs. Edmunds?
This figure is the difference between the EPA's energy consumption estimate and the energy consumption Edmunds calculated based on our real-world testing. A positive percentage (in green) means a vehicle used that much less energy than its EPA estimate and was more efficient in Edmunds' testing. A negative percentage (in red) means a vehicle used that much more energy than its EPA estimate and was less efficient in Edmunds' testing. Remember, a lower kWh/100 miles number is better if you're talking EVs.

What is ambient temperature and why does it matter?
Ambient temperature — how cold or hot it is outside — matters a whole lot when it comes to electric vehicle range, so we list the daily average temperature on the day of testing. California, and more specifically Los Angeles, has one of the more temperate climates in the world, which helps keep our testing conditions relatively consistent throughout the year. But since we can't control the weather, we thought we'd at least report it.

How does Edmunds conduct its testing?
The roads
Edmunds drives on specific road routes that cover both highway and city driving around the greater Los Angeles area. We aim for a mix of 60% city driving and 40% highway, assuming that most electric vehicle owners will likely spend more time in stop-and-go traffic than they will on the open highway. Since no electric vehicle has exactly the same range, the route length is adapted to suit each vehicle.

The methodology
In EPA tests, a vehicle is run in the default settings at startup. If there are more efficient drive modes available, or if you can increase the level of regenerative braking, but the vehicle doesn't default to these settings, they won't be utilized. Edmunds' standard practice is to use the most efficient drive mode as long as it doesn't affect safety or practical comfort levels, such as deactivating the climate control system or significantly reducing power for accelerating or maintaining appropriate highway speeds.

We run with windows up and the climate control set to auto at 72 degrees, and we maximize regenerative braking during stops. We follow the posted speed limits and keep within 5 mph of them, traffic and conditions permitting.

Which number is more accurate, EPA or Edmunds?
The short answer is neither. So many factors contribute to how far an electric vehicle will travel on a single charge that to come up with a single figure for every situation is impossible. The EPA's testing is highly controlled and standardized, but as we've found in our testing, the real-world correlation can vary dramatically depending on the vehicle.

Because Edmunds' testing uses a more conservative driving style and puts greater emphasis on city driving over highway driving (compared to the EPA's mix), our figures will often be on the higher end for range, which usually equates to better efficiency. But that's not always the case. Overall, our figures are intended to provide EV owners and potential customers with an additional data point so that they can make more informed decisions.





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Vim Schrotnock

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Wow! 4S better mileage than the Model S. Should have been 123 miles worse and it was 5 miles better. The Tesla numbers weren't far off, but the Taycan EPA numbers were not even in the same ballpark as actual. Maybe Porsche should re-certify the cars...🤔
 

PanameraFrank

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323 miles? Y
Anyone getting over 300 miles per “tank” as this suggests? My 4S is on order and I would LOVE to get that kind of range !
Lol no, I don't even know how they did it. Must have obeyed the speed limit or something.

280-290 is the most you can realistically expect given ideal weather.
 

TYKHAAAN

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Hell, that 280 -290 sounds outstanding, especially compared to the real world numbers of Teslas Tested. They explain in the article how they got those numbers, but they also point out many factors can influence range and their numbers are no more accurate than EPA. Just to use a data point for consumers. I’m taking my Taycan on a road trip next month, so I’ll see what I get.
 

tez1

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Anyone getting over 300 miles per “tank” as this suggests? My 4S is on order and I would LOVE to get that kind of range !
No..... This is rubbish!!
 

daveo4EV

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my California trip to Los Alamos and back strongly indicated that 270 miles is a easy easy gig for a Taycan Turbo…even with the Mission-E wheels…

https://www.taycanforum.com/forum/t...-ca-to-los-alamos-ca-to-aptos-ca-w-data.2659/

…The Drive to Bob's well bread used 72% SOC (arriving at 28% SOC) with 78 miles "left" on the range meter in the center of the dash display. This places the Taycan firmly in the 280 mile range category - and strangely enough the exact distance was 201.9 miles - which is the Taycan's EPA rating. We we drove the EPA distance and arrived with 28% battery left over. …
this data is very consistent with the Edmunds results - 300 miles is a stretch goal - but 270 is in line with distance I often achieved with my Model S P85D

closer to 300 is doable with: 4S, and non-Mission-E wheels - better speed limit discipline.
 

REIL

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Anyone getting over 300 miles per “tank” as this suggests? My 4S is on order and I would LOVE to get that kind of range !
Last fall with warmer temps I saw 300 to 338 range at 10C to 15C.
(Actual range will vary or be lower depending on driving mode selected and actual speeds driving.)
With snow and colder temps seeing 258-265 miles @ 85% SoC and 282-289 miles at 100% SoC from 0C to -5C on Pirelli PZero Elect 20in snow tires. Both fall and winter numbers are with these tires.
MY20 4S+
Images are from early December 2020.
Hope this helps.

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Doc B

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On that article, the consumption is shown as 32.3 kWh/100miles - that’s not 323 miles of range. You’d need consumption around 26 kWh/100miles for that kind of range. Maybe just a mistake or, quite likely, my maths is out. I think that article could potentially be misleading for new owners - at least in the UK which, for many reasons, is not California! Sure, height of Summer you’ll get 270-280 miles, but Autumn (15C) I was down to 230 miles and now in the Winter pretty much spot on the EPA figures if not lower. That’s when driving very conservatively. Incredible Summer car, not great range in a UK winter. That’s not to say it’s a problem, but new buyers should be aware.
 

andix

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On a test 4S, I got even below 20kWh – in range mode, of course.
The good thing is that you can use range mode frequently, as it's just a turn on the perf selector.

Average I had 26ish–in summary I was very impressed by the range.
 

Doc B

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On a test 4S, I got even below 20kWh – in range mode, of course.
The good thing is that you can use range mode frequently, as it's just a turn on the perf selector.

Average I had 26ish–in summary I was very impressed by the range.
I assume you’re talking per 100km rather than 100miles? I think the Edmunds article is miles. 323 miles is around 26 kWh/100miles or 16 kWh/100km. I think...
 

W1NGE

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No..... This is rubbish!!
No yet had the joy of warmer months to see these numbers but at best I get 220 - 225 miles (Nov'20 - Feb'21).

I would be mighty impressed if the range increases by ~ 35% come April / May - it may make up for all the other faults I / we are having to contend with on a weekly / daily basis!
 

Dee

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If you're interested in range and efficiency you shouldn't have bought a Porsche in the first place.
If I have to make another stop, so be it.
C'mon guys...
 

PanameraFrank

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As mentioned, 32.3/100 kWh is only about 265 miles and normal consumption for a 75+ mph highway drive in summer.

Oh. Wait. LOL. Edmunds got 32.3kWh/100 miles.. and "323" range. Anyone else see the problem? My guess is they did a shorter test and attempted to math out the range based on the consumption number they saw, but instead of dividing against the battery capacity (approx 86 kWh usable) they divided against 100.

It's either a typo or someone at Edmunds tried to take a shortcut.
 
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W1NGE

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If you're interested in range and efficiency you shouldn't have bought a Porsche in the first place.
If I have to make another stop, so be it.
C'mon guys...
I think the point here is to disseminate between fact (real world experiences from real owners) and fantasy (marketing guff / poorly executed testing regimes) penned by journalists who struggle to spell "EV" (no disrespect to journos out there).

I don't think I've read anything which provides a consistent view - independent or otherwise. The fact is no two Taycans (or EVs in general for that matter) will get the same range in the same way we don't all get the same technical faults (which is a more pressing concern).

The range is what it is and we chose to live in the climates we do but all the publicly quoted statistics reported for this vehicle need a heavy dose of caveat medicine before anyone can take them seriously.
 

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